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Privacy & Security

Report: Vaccination Scheduling, Administration,and Documentation in a Digital World

December 20, 2021

In a panel discussion, Executives for Health Innovation (EHI) CEO Jennifer Covich Bordenick joined executives from Change Healthcare to discuss the topic of vaccination scheduling, administration and documentation in a digital world.

The hour long discussion was focused on implementing touchless workflows to adopt to consumer preferences.

Webinar: The Current and Future State of Digital Health Credentials: Here to Stay

December 01, 2021

Although digital health credentials are not new, they rose quickly to international attention in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and have stayed in the news given recent vaccine mandates.

Hear from experts in healthcare and health technology about where things stand now with respect to their benefits, at-times controversial implementation, ethical and privacy implications — and where we go from here.

Join us as we discuss the current and future state of digital health credentials.

Sponsored by:

 

 

Speakers 


  • Sunil Budhrani, MD, MPH, MBA, Chief Executive Officer & Chief Medical Officer, Innovation Health 

  • Quentin Palfrey, President, International Digital Accountability Council (IDAC)

  • Eric Piscini, Global VP Payer and Emerging Business Networks, IBM Watson Health

  • Gautam M. Shah, Vice President, Platform and Marketplace, Change Healthcare

WEBINAR: The Current and Future State of Digital Health Credentials

Although digital health credentials are not new, they rose quickly to international attention in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and have stayed in the news given recent vaccine mandates.

Hear from experts in healthcare and health technology about where things stand now with respect to their benefits, at-times controversial implementation, ethical and privacy implications — and where we go from here.

Sponsored by:

eHI and Philips Release Report: Cybersecurity in Healthcare: Challenges, Risks and the Path Forward

Washington, DC – October 12, 2021 - Today, Philips and the eHealth Initiative and Foundation (eHI) released a report entitled Cybersecurity in Healthcare: Challenges, Risks and the Path Forward. The report contains insights from an Executive Roundtable panel comprised of experts from the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), Intermountain Healthcare, the Healthcare and Public Sector Coordinating Council (HSCC), Cigna, Northwell and Philips.

WEBINAR: Digital Health Credentials

June 01, 2021

Although “vaccine passport” is the buzziest of buzz-phrases these days, digital health credentials have actually been around for years. The benefits they offer to providers and consumers alike are many, but as with most advances in health tech, they are not without their challenges. In this webinar, eHI teamed up with expert panelists to discuss these challenges, including identity verification and workflow issues, and how they relate to the new CMS/ONC interoperability and information blocking rules.

 

Speakers: 


Jeri Koester

Chief Information Officer
Marshfield Clinic Health System

Jeri Koester assumed the role of Interim CIO and then CIO of Marshfield Clinic Health System in early 2019. She previously was vice president of IT business management at Marshfield Clinic Information Services (MCIS Inc.) since October 2016. Prior to that role, Koester was the vice president of operations, the IT division and was instrumental in leading Marshfield Clinic’s transition of their IT department into a for-profit subsidiary of the health system. Her experience also includes senior project management for one of the nation’s largest window and door manufacturers completing a restructure of the manufacturing footprint. She also brings business startup experience from one of the leading software companies in the fenestration industry where she managed sales and sales projections, client accounts, project implementations, and development teams. Koester earned her Bachelor of Business Administration degree from the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire and is a certified project manager professional from the Project Management Institute.

 

 


Mark Treshock
Blockchain Solutions Leader for Healthcare and Life Sciences
IBM

Mark Treshock, IBM’s Global Leader for Blockchain Solutions in Healthcare and Life Sciences has spent his career helping organizations, their constituents and consumers benefit from digital transformation. His current focus is on strengthening the national response to COVID-19 through improved supply chain visibility and the creation of networks of trust including New York State’s Excelsior Pass. Mr. Treshock is a frequent speaker at conferences including the World Economic Forum’s annual conference at Davos. He has also presented on Capitol Hill and the White House. 

 

 

 


Dr. Matthew Harris

Northwell Health 

Dr. Harris is triple boarded in General Pediatrics, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, and Emergency Medical Services, having completed residency and two fellowships. Dr. Harris works clinically in the pediatric emergency department, caring for acutely ill and injured children. He is the emergency medicine Medical Director of the Northwell Neonatal and Pediatric Critical Care Transport team and chairs the Mass Casualty Incident Preparedness Committee at the system Children’s Hospital. Dr. Harris serves as the associate medical director for the Northwell Center for Emergency Medical Services and the Medical Director of Emergency Management and Clinical Preparedness. Currently, Dr. Harris it the physician lead for the COVID 19 Vaccination Program for Northwell Health. 

 

 

 


Todd Gherke
Chief Architect
ID2020

Todd Gehrke serves as Chief Architect at ID2020, where he provides technical guidance for the development of privacy-protecting, user-controlled, and portable digital identity solutions.

Todd is a software engineer and systems architect with over 25 years of experience developing large-scale, fault-tolerant distributed systems. His work spans multiple industries, including telecommunications, healthcare, and manufacturing. Prior to joining ID2020, he developed solutions using distributed ledger technologies and remains an outspoken advocate for the adoption of decentralized identity and privacy-preserving cryptography,

Todd has a BS in Computer Science from Montana State University in Bozeman. He is a world traveler who currently lives in Seattle but still considers Montana his home.

 

 

 


JP Pollak
Chief Architect
The Commons Project

JP is co-founder and Chief Architect of The Commons Project Foundation and the technical co-chair for VCI. He is also a Senior Researcher in Residence at Cornell Tech and an Assistant Professor at Weill Cornell Medicine, where he has focused on helping individuals collect health data from real-world settings and their clinical record for research and care. This work included being a co-creator and governance committee member for ResearchStack, the Android equivalent to Apple’s ResearchKit, and launching Android equivalent to Apple Health. JP has also founded Curiosity Health to better support early stage, digitally-enabled clinical research; founded Wellcoin, an award-winning consumer health incentives application; and built numerous applications in health and life sciences that are widely used in research and business today. JP earned a Master's degree in Human-Computer Interaction and a PhD in Information Science at Cornell University.

 

 


Alice Leiter
Vice President and Senior Counsel
eHealth Initiative

Alice is a health regulatory lawyer with a specialty in health information privacy law and policy. She previously worked as a Senior Associate at the law firm Hogan Lovells, where she worked with clients on Medicare and Medicaid pricing and reimbursement. Alice spent several years as policy counsel at two different non-profit organizations, the National Partnership for Women & Families and the Center for Democracy & Technology. She currently sits on the DC HIE Policy Board, as well as the boards of Beauvoir School, Educare DC, and DC Greens, the latter of which she chairs. She received her B.A. in human biology from Stanford University and her J.D. from the Georgetown University Law Center. Alice and her husband, Michael, live in Washington, D.C. with their four children.

 

This webinar was supported by 

WEBINAR: HIPAA for Dummies Part II

 

You’re not dummies! But the legal protections surrounding health data are complicated, and we’re here to help. Join us for a reboot of our popular first “HIPAA for Dummies” webinar, during which we’ll break down the HIPAA law, its regulations, and detail the “wild west”ern landscape of protections for health data once it leaves the traditional health care system. We’ll also give an update on the new CMS and ONC Rules affecting individual access to health data, and update you on proposed changes to HIPAA currently under review at HHS.

WEBINAR: COVID-19 Vaccine Administration & Tracking: Understanding the Privacy Implications

April 27, 2021

At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, privacy concerns related to contact tracing were a dominating topic in the national dialogue around the virus. As its days appear finally to be numbered, it is closing with an uproar over the privacy implications of “vaccine passports” and the delicate balance between protecting the public and an individual’s right to privacy. Along the way, we as a nation have worried about data collection, storage, and sharing; public health surveillance; and potential bias and discrimination related to one’s COVID and/or vaccine status. Although there are no easy answers to these complex public health, civil liberties, and equity issues, understanding the issues and where the tensions lie is key to combating and ultimately eradicating the virus.

eHI's Alice Leiter joined panelists Chuck Curran, head of CDC Consulting and a collaborator with the Good Pass Collaborative, and privacy attorneys Karen Mandelbaum of Epstein Becker Green and Madeline Gitomer of Hogan Lovells, for a discussion of privacy issues related to COVID-19.

 

 

Speakers:


Madeline Gitomer
Senior Associate
Hogan Lovells

Madeline Gitomer works with legal counsel and privacy officers to navigate the regulatory landscape for organizations responding to cyber attacks and data breaches. Whether it is life sciences, education technology, digital health, or technology-driven startups, Madeline regularly advises clients on compliance with various data privacy laws, regulations, and public policy initiatives. She served as a professional staff member for the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions. Maddy holds a J.D. and a M.S. Ed from the University of Pennsylvania. 

 


Karen Mandelbaum
Senior Counsel
Epstein Becker Green

Karen Mandelbaum is a Senior Counsel in the Health Care and Life Sciences practice, in the Washington, DC, office of Epstein Becker Green. Prior to joining Epstein Becker Green, Ms. Mandelbaum served as the Senior Advisor for Security & Privacy Policy and Governance to the Chief Information Officer, Chief Information Security Officer, and Senior Official for Privacy in the Office of Information Technology at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), where she was responsible for developing and implementing an integrated approach to CMS’s cybersecurity and privacy program.  She was previously a Privacy Policy Subject Matter Expert at the Center for Consumer Information & Insurance Oversight (CCIIO), responsible for defining the scope of privacy requirements and the privacy policy program for the health insurance exchanges and the Federally-Facilitated Marketplace.

 


Chuck Curran
CDC Consulting LLC

Chuck advises on industry self regulation and accountability for ad-supported digital products and services. He was previously AOL’s Chief Counsel for policy and regulatory matters. He is a contributor to the Good Health Pass Collaborative, an open, cross-sector initiative for digital health passes.

 

 

 

Alice Leiter
Vice President and Senior Counsel
eHealth Initiative 

Alice is a health regulatory lawyer with a specialty in health information privacy law and policy. She previously worked as a Senior Associate at the law firm Hogan Lovells, where she worked with clients on Medicare and Medicaid pricing and reimbursement. Alice spent several years as policy counsel at two different non-profit organizations, the National Partnership for Women & Families and the Center for Democracy & Technology. She currently sits on the DC HIE Policy Board, as well as the boards of Beauvoir School, Educare DC, and DC Greens, the latter of which she chairs. She received her B.A. in human biology from Stanford University and her J.D. from the Georgetown University Law Center. Alice and her husband, Michael, live in Washington, D.C. with their four children.

Privacy, Passports, and Public Health

April 14, 2021

It is nearly impossible to read or listen to the news these days without seeing or hearing something about “vaccine passports.” Do we need them? Do we want them? Are they happening regardless, and if so, where and when?

As the conversation swirls around the utility and benefit of a simple, fast way to see if individuals – students, customers, employees – have been vaccinated against COVID-19, the legal and ethical implications of any such system have turned the whole issue into, as the New York Times said this week, a “cultural flashpoint.”

A vaccine passport is a standardized credential that would allow people to prove that they have been vaccinated against COVID-19. They have been oft-discussed in relation to travel, and airlines such as Jet Blue and United have already implemented them on select flights through an application called Common Pass. Universities including Northeastern, Brown, Cornell, and Rutgers have all said in recent weeks that they will require proof of vaccination in order to allow students to return to campus in the fall. And New York has rolled out the “Excelsior Pass,” described by the state as “a free, fast and secure way to present digital proof of Covid-19 vaccination” in the event that large venues such as sports arenas or concert halls require proof of an entrant’s vaccination status. 

Whether or not such a requirement is legal depends on whether or not the entity implementing it is public or private – in some senses, this can be seen as akin to a “no shirt, no shoes, no service” edict by local businesses. Regardless of its legality, however, there are significant and legitimate concerns that the credential, or lack thereof, could be used against people unfairly, or in a manner that promotes or results in discrimination or bias.

After the governor of Texas used his executive power Tuesday to ban the state and organizations that receive funding from the state from requiring vaccine passports, over concerns that they intrude on “personal freedoms,” White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki made clear that the federal government “is not now, nor will we be, supporting a system that requires Americans to carry a credential…There will be no federal vaccinations database and no federal mandate requiring everyone to obtain a single vaccination credential.” Citing concerns related to equity, the World Health Organization also said on Tuesday that it currently does not support mandatory proof of vaccination for international travel.

Regardless, Walmart, which is the country’s largest private employer, has already begun offering electronic applications verifying the vaccination status of patients who receive their vaccines at Walmart, and there are at least 17 different vaccine passport development initiatives currently underway, according to the Washington Post, for use by businesses who want to restrict admission to those who have been vaccinated.

Is your head hurting yet?? In an effort to help increase understanding of the current landscape and the legal, privacy, and ethical issues at play, eHI is hosting a webinar on April 27 at 2:00 EDT. Join us to have all your questions answered (we hope!) – register and submit your questions below. 

WEBINAR: COVID-19 Vaccine Administration & Tracking: Understanding the Privacy Implications

At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, privacy concerns related to contact tracing were a dominating topic in the national dialogue around the virus. As its days appear finally to be numbered, it is closing with an uproar over the privacy implications of “vaccine passports” and the delicate balance between protecting the public and an individual’s right to privacy. Along the way, we as a nation have worried about data collection, storage, and sharing; public health surveillance; and potential bias and discrimination related to one’s COVID and/or vaccine status.

Executive Spotlight: Protecting “Health-Ish” Data

March 03, 2021

As we enter our third month of 2021 and the new Administration and Congress, new national, comprehensive data privacy legislation is still not guaranteed any time soon. In the absence of such a law, consumer health data remains governed by HIPAA, several other narrowly applicable federal laws, and a patchwork of state laws and regulations, leading to concern about how under-protected health data is collected, used, and shared. The exponential proliferation of mobile health applications, wearable devices, remote monitoring and online health-related communication in recent years has accelerated the need for prompt federal and industry action. Additionally, the COVID-19 pandemic has shone a spotlight on the collection and sharing of data and the legal landscape that does – or does not – protect it.

In this featured panel from eHI’s Annual Meeting in January, eHI Vice President and Senior Counsel Alice Leiter joined Jodie Daniel of Crowell & Moring, Laura Hoffman of the AMA, and Liz Salmi of OpenNotes and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center to discuss the challenging balance of shoring up legal protections for the increasing amount of non-HIPAA-covered health data, establishing consumer trust in new technologies, and encouraging innovation in health and health care.