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Industry Perspectives

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Coronavirus could be a boon for telemedicine, as health industry hopes to keep ‘worried well’ out of the hospital

March 06, 2020

Coronavirus could be a boon for telemedicine, as health industry hopes to keep ‘worried well’ out of the hospital

As the COVID-19 cases continue to spread across the U.S., hospitals and insurance companies are expecting a swell in visitors to clinics and emergency rooms.

But the crisis could provide a bright spot for one sector of the health industry that has struggled to gain widespread acceptance: Telemedicine.

Virtual services, like online symptom-checking tools and remote consults with doctors, could keep the so-called “worried well” from flooding hospitals. If the healthiest people don’t show up in emergency rooms, that could mean that more resources are available to treat the sickest and most vulnerable patients. 

The full CNBC article can be viewed at this link.  

Name: 
Anna

Telehealth Beyond The Hospital

March 06, 2020

Telehealth Beyond The Hospital

The industry of telehealth is expanding for many reasons, including increased access to technology, a demand for more affordable health services and the desire for convenient care. Research findings projected a compound annual growth rate between 2014 and 2020 of 18.4% for telehealth services.

Telehealth can reduce initial hospital admissions, readmissions, length of stay and mortality rates. By expanding telehealth services to the outpatient industry, emergency department visits are reduced, patient engagement and health management are encouraged, and the overall cost of chronic disease management is lowered.

The full Forbes article can be viewed at this link.  

Name: 
Anna

Insurers promise to cover coronavirus tests, relax coverage policies

March 06, 2020

Insurers promise to cover coronavirus tests, relax coverage policies

A major health insurance trade group is pledging its member plans will cover doctor-ordered testing for the coronavirus amid rising confusion and concern about who will bear the cost of care in an outbreak.

America’s Health Insurance Plans made the commitment Thursday, although it's still unclear when insurers might have to start paying for tests. So far, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has picked up the tab for COVID-19 testing. The cost picture is expected to become more complicated as more private labs and academic medical centers launch their own testing. Thursday alone, commercial labs Quest Diagnostics, LabCorp and BioReference Laboratories announced they'd launch testing for the virus.

The full Politico article can be viewed at this link.  

Name: 
Anna

Six Healthcare Trends To Watch For 2020

March 05, 2020

Six Healthcare Trends To Watch For 2020

As we begin the new decade, I'd like to talk about six major healthcare industry trends that I'm most excited about in 2020.

  1. AI-Powered Tools To Increase Efficiency
  2. Using The Cloud To Break Down Silos And Move Data Faster
  3. Ensuring Patient Consent In The Big Data Era
  4. Virtual Solutions For Busy Medical Professionals
  5. Demystifying Healthcare Data For Patients
  6. Home-Based Healthcare

The full Forbes article can be viewed at this link.  

Name: 
Anna

Precision medicine: course correction urgently needed

March 03, 2020

Precision medicine: course correction urgently needed

An undeclared civil war is breaking out in biomedicine. On one side is precision medicine, with its emphasis on tailoring treatments to ever-narrower groups of patients. On the other side is population health, which emphasizes predominantly preventive interventions that have broad applications across populations.

Which vision will provide the most durable and efficient path to improved health for all?

Precision medicine is a merger of molecular genetics, the dominant vision in biology, and genomics, the expression of that vision in human health. Disregarding the “breakthrough” announcements that appear on a regular basis, the question of whether precision medicine will lead to better health for all remains an open one.

The full STAT article can be viewed at this link.  

Name: 
Anna

'Fixing health care' is a disservice to society

March 03, 2020

'Fixing health care' is a disservice to society

We all know — and the presidential candidates keep reminding us at every debate and in the run-up to Super Tuesday — that our health care system is struggling to provide Americans with affordable care. While we broadly agree that health care needs to be fixed, the conversation on “how” is headed down the wrong path. Instead of looking for solutions to patch up the current system, we should think anew for higher efficiencies, lower costs and, most importantly, better outcomes.  

We should start by asking how we use existing and emerging technologies to invent a preventive, proactive, predictive, and personalized self-care system that delivers tenfold cost-effectiveness enhancements. How do we seize the new economics of a tech-enabled national health care system? Many of the tools needed to affect this transformation are now available; others are rapidly evolving. Health care policymakers need to focus on cultivating and rapidly incorporating a new tech-enabled paradigm of health management while phasing out the old.  

The full opinion piece from The Hill can be viewed at this link.  

Name: 
Anna

FHIR Fever Is Catching On In Healthcare

March 02, 2020

FHIR Fever Is Catching On In Healthcare

It's been almost two decades since the nonprofit Health Level Seven International (HL7) created the FHIR standard, now on its fourth release. The forces of government regulation, consumer demand, competition and the journey to value-based care are creating new pressure on the healthcare industry to embrace interoperability, a Deloitte report says, with FHIR emerging as the common language. Open standards to link diagnostic, clinical health and certain administrative data can reduce medical errors, eliminate opportunities for fraud and bring down the data siloes that account for so much waste.

The full Forbes article can be viewed at this link.  

Name: 
Anna

Implications of artificial intelligence for medical education

March 01, 2020

Implications of artificial intelligence for medical education

Although digital health has occasioned huge changes for medicine, the issues it provokes have yet to be integrated into teaching and learning across the medical education continuum. This question is all the more pressing given that the rise of artificial intelligence (AI) systems, discussed here as a specific example of healthcare’s digitalisation, are associated with a fundamental paradigm shift in teaching. Whereas 20th-century medical education models relied on experimental results evolving into a recognised standard that then informed textbook teaching, today this sequencing no longer holds. The speed at which new health AI technologies are developing, being introduced into clinical practice, and being used by patients requires equipping doctors to deal appropriately with experimental techniques that have not yet become part of a generally accepted body of knowledge. Agile teaching and educated guesswork about which treatments will benefit patients the most are crucial for enabling physicians to lead the introduction of such technologies without simply being forced to react to them.

The full comment can be downloaded below.  

Name: 
Anna

Nurturing the digital baby: Open innovation for development and optimization

March 01, 2020

Nurturing the digital baby: Open innovation for development and optimization

The primary aim around developing and optimizing an electronic health record is to improve patient care and population health. The objective of this study is to design and evaluate an action research approach for the optimization of the design of a summary page artefact within an electronic health record for newborn healthcare. An action research approach was chosen for its participatory democratic process for developing practical knowledge and solutions. Collaborative workshops lead by an independent graphic facilitator with a ‘bottom up’ approach, involving self-selected motivated members from multidisciplinary healthcare teams, were designed and conducted. To evaluate this approach, insights were drawn from behavioural and design science paradigms to demonstrate that knowledge and understanding of the design problem and its solution were acquired in building the optimized summary page artefact. Information system development for healthcare requires consideration not just of what we do but how and why we do things. Our analysis demonstrates that action design research represents an agile and lean approach for successful optimization and implementation of information system development in healthcare.

The full article can be viewed at this link.  

Name: 
Anna

PRESCRIPTION PRICE TRANSPARENCY AND THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE

March 01, 2020

PRESCRIPTION PRICE TRANSPARENCY AND THE PATIENT EXPERIENCE

As stories about sticker shock and the cost of care dominate headlines and policy discussions, healthcare organizations are looking for cost-effective ways to improve patient outcomes and experience. Prescription price transparency tools hold particular promise. We already know that providers want greater price transparency for their patients. In fact, 74% of U.S. physicians say they want to see a patient’s medical benefit information before prescribing, and 59% want to compare the cost of similar medications. 

Are patients equally eager to talk medication costs and coverage at the point of care? Surescripts commissioned a survey of 1,001 U.S. patients to understand their prescription challenges, desires and behavior—and how their experience with their prescriptions affects the healthcare decisions they make.

The full Surescripts report can be viewed at this link.  

Name: 
Anna